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Jew in a Box
Salomon Says

Jew in a Box

Controversial museum exhibit in Berlin creates quite a stir.

by

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Published: April 6, 2013

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Visitor Comments: 42

(35) Anonymous, August 24, 2013 8:09 AM

Germans don't know Jews

Encountering a Jew in Germany is so rare, that yes, elevating the experience to an abstract display ( as was done with the box - to show that we are also humans) is maybe what Germans need.
Actually this saddens Me as a Jew living in Germany

(34) Beverly Kurtin, April 21, 2013 10:48 PM

I see nothing wrong or degrading

If the gentleman had just been sitting at a desk or in just a chair, who would even notice? But "Jew in the Box?" Now THAT is attention-getting. Isolation? Yes! Because that is the way man people see us, as being somehow trying to be above others, especially when they (deliberately?) misunderstand what it means when Hashem called us his "chosen people."
I've spoken at churches or hosted church people at my shul and when the question invariably arises, "Why do you Jews call yourselves the chosen people?" I just say NOTHING. I open my Tenach and ask the to turn to the appropriate section of their bibles and ask in return,"Would someone please read WHO said that we are chosen?"
Who is speaking? G-d or the Jewish people? From this day on, never tell the untruth that the Jews call themselves chosen. G-d said it, not us. But what were we chosen for? To be better than others? No, not at all, that is absurd. We were chosen to keep commands that non-Jews don't HAVE to keep. Do you feel guilty when eating bacon and eggs? How about when chomping on a ham sandwich? Jews are prohibited from eating anything from a pig, you are not.
Jews have many obligations that non-Jews don't. That is all that G-d meant when he said we were chosen for his service. READ what the bible says, not what you think it says.
THOSE are the kinds of question the "Jew in the Box" was probably asked...and more.
Again, the BOX was what gave him the opportunity to have conversations with people who might not otherwise had that opportunity.
I applaud the entire idea! By being in the box, light was shed and light is what is needed to dim the darkness of Jew-hate.

(33) Jim Stivers, April 14, 2013 2:29 AM

Double edged

I agree with the Rabbi. However, being a bit contraversial will stir up attention that was not there before and some conversations that weren't done before either. Also given the current rise of hatred that seems to be out there,it might be a good form of safety as well.

(32) Barbara, April 12, 2013 5:56 PM

Like the exhibit overall

I agree that it would be better to have a Jew in the exhibit to answer questions, but not in a box. However, if the box is there to protect the person from a crazy person, then perhaps its a good idea. What's the likelihood of the Jew being attacked in Germany? I don't think the exhibit is degrading overall -- it's a great idea to have a real person in the exhibit, so that visitors can feel free to ask questions, rather than people wandering around the exhibit hall asking whether they can answer questions, which may inhibit most people.

(31) Miek, April 11, 2013 11:20 PM

Out Of the Box

Being in a box connotes having to be contained, isolated, constrained. And especially in Germany - the next notch downwards would have been barbed wire strung around the display. Sorry, but this is offensive to me.

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