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Trayvon and the Hoodie
Salomon Says

Trayvon and the Hoodie

Does clothing make the man?

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Published: April 29, 2012


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Visitor Comments: 154

(112) Steven Stone, May 15, 2012 6:29 PM

People dress to make a statement

Baggy clothes originally became fashionable because it was easier to shop lift and hide items.This was before alarm sensors were installed. Men wearing pants halfway down their back became popular in prisons to show they weren't afraid of the other prisoners. This was picked up by the mainstream. Finally a lot of stores do not allow hoodies to be worn in those stores for obvious reasons. Why? Let the statistical facts speak for themselves or in the alternative become poltically correct.

(111) Dr. William Josephs, May 13, 2012 7:34 PM

Sad

The Jewish people are supposed to be leaders. I find Rav Salomon’s point of view appalling. What type of clothing did the rabbi wear when he was age 17? Certainly, I had long hair and wore blue jeans and T-shirts and I doubt that the young Mr. Solomon dressed very differently. Highlighting the impervious and short-sighted position of Rav Salomon, I recall being at an in-door-out-door Chabad shul one Shabbos, not long after the Trayvon Martin story broke in the news. And what did I see? The rabbi’s 12 year old son wearing a hoodie. It struck me at the time how garrulously self-sanctimonious and off-base this already articulated position actually was. I believe that it was Geraldo Rivera who first made this errant remark. Trayvon Martin was dressing in a manner that was appropriate for his age-group and the weather that evening. How outrageous to pose the disingenuous argument that this teenage boy should have been wearing a suit. As a matter of fact, throughout the last millennium, Jewish people were tracked down and killed for the same and worse reasons; their dress, which identified them as Jews. George Zimmerman, despite being told by police not to follow the boy, tracked him down and killed him. The most likely scenario from the boy, who became aware that he was being followed, with malicious intent (and although certainly not Jewish) acted in accordance with Torah teachings. He attempted a first strike. He was unable to disabled his self-appointed killer and was murdered, because Zimmerman was the self-appointed executioner of a teenager armed with a soft-drink and a bag of Skittles. As for the pending trial, watch for the after-the-fact rationalizations to defend the murderous act.

Naryssa, May 25, 2012 3:50 PM

Thank you

Thank you very much, Dr.Josephs, for being so very rational. I'm so sick of other people deciding who deserves to live and die because of their appearance. It's nice to know I'm not the only person who realizes people have a right to live in peace.

(110) Kennyg5, May 10, 2012 3:39 PM

Clothing does matter

Your appearance does make a statement to everyone you meet. When you are shopping and see a person in scrubs in the store, what do you think? You see a person in a utility uniform, what do you think? A person in sweats, a person in a suit, a person with multiple piercings, or tattoos, or a bandana with low slung pants. You naturally identify that person with something you think and automatically label them. It is an instinct. Friend or foe. It's a matter of what do you want other people to perceive you as when you walk out that door. If you want to look the Gangsta part, people that don't know you will see you that way. If a real Gangsta was sitting there and saw someone with a hoody walking thru back yards looking in windows, what's he going to think? This is a sad case and a lot of errors in judgement on both sides resulted in a tragedy. And the media has done nothing but fuel the flames just to get a story. Sad sad sad. My prayers go out to all who are involved.

(109) Alan, May 9, 2012 1:00 AM

hiddur mitzvah

There is such a thing as hiddur mitzvah, which I translate as "presentation." We need to be conscious of how we dress, how wwe present, in the smae manner as which we eat, put on tefillin and hold a child. If we care aboout what we eat, how we say oour brachot, to even how we say eishet chayil-and to whom we are addrerssing, I think it behooves us to dress with the same ferer.

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