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Terror In London

Terror In London

Yesterday terror arrived on our doorstep. Like Israelis, now I, too, must worry about getting on a train or my son taking a bus to school.

by
Growing up post-Holocaust, my generation has never experienced a war. And growing up in England, my generation has never experienced the horrors of terror. The attacks in Israel, while incredibly painful, were also pretty distant. 9/11 was closer to home, but still far enough away. Yesterday, however, terror arrived on our doorstep.

I remember an article in the Sunday Times around five years ago. It was written as though a terror attack had occurred in London the day before. The writer’s aim was to warn graphically about what the future might hold. At that pre 9/11 time, it seemed to me to be incredible fantasy. Turns out the fantasy had been mine.

At about 9.30 a.m. I was sitting in my office in Hendon, around six miles from the attacks. I was browsing cnn.com and noticed a headline talking about explosions in the London Underground due to power surges. It sounded a little suspicious, so I moved on to the BBC. No news. Thisislondon.com -- no news. (Looks like America knows what’s going on in the UK before we do!)

I kept my eye on things until I left the office at 10:00 a.m. to head to the hospital for a routine check up with my wife. Reports were now coming in on the UK websites about these ‘power surges’, but it still seemed rather strange. Aldgate and Liverpool Street might be close to each other, but Edgware Road is in a different part of town. As I got in my car, I switched on the radio. This did not sound like electrical problems to me.

As we were driving to the hospital, Radio 5 reported that a woman had just called in saying she had seen a bus explode in Russell Square. How do underground power surges blow up buses? But still no one seemed to want to believe what was by now blatantly obvious.

Maybe it was terror, possibly it was terror. No one seemed brave enough to say it for sure. Islamic terror just didn’t exist in on our little island. It couldn’t be. Yes, there had been IRA terror in the past. But there were always advance warnings and it was mostly directed against army and political targets. This random targeting of innocents with its sole purpose to kill and maim as many as possible was, and is, something completely new.

We arrived at the hospital to find they were not letting cars in. Security men were blocking the road and only ambulances were allowed to enter. It wasn’t the main hospital for casualties, but many arrived while we were there. Surely this was a scene from Hadassah in Jerusalem or Tel Hashomer in Tel Aviv, not the Whittington Hospital in London. The mood in the obstetrics waiting room was surreal. The television was on and you could hear a pin drop. People were in shock. Everyone was watching: patients, doctors, nurses, midwives all came in to see what was happening. The headline across the screen had been inconceivable to me only a few years ago:

Terror attacks in Central London.

It occurred to me that only two days before, I had been on the London Underground at exactly the same time and place at which one of the bombs had exploded. It also occurred to me that unlike 9/11, those who carried out this attack are still alive and surely planning more. Yes, terror has very much arrived on my doorstep. Like Israelis, now I, too, must worry about getting on a train or my son taking a bus to school. Now I really do have a small inkling of how it feels.

It’s been too easy for us to feel safe in our own countries and not show the solidarity that Israel has needed.
I noticed an article this morning about a missing Israeli who had moved here because of the buses blowing up in Israel. She was safe in London… until she boarded a number 30 bus in Russell Square on Thursday. I was also thinking of the many parents who have been reluctant to allow their children to attend our programs in Israel and the people afraid to travel to Israel because of the terror. Now what? Now where to? Move to Australia. And then? Antarctica maybe?

I am reminded of the story of the man who meets the Angel of Death in Baghdad. The Angel of Death clearly knows him, but is surprised to see him. The man borrows the fastest horse he can find and rides through the night to Damascus to escape the angel’s clutches, only to meet him there the next morning. Before he is taken, he asks the Angel of Death why he was so surprised to meet him the night before in Baghdad. The angel responds that he knew he had an appointment with him the next morning in Damascus, but he didn’t see how the man could possibly get there on time.

There are so many messages we must take from what has happened; I would like to focus on only one. As Jews in the Diaspora, I believe we have not supported Israel enough by visiting through these difficult years. It’s just been too easy for us to feel safe in our own countries and not show the solidarity that Israel has needed. But now we are no safer here than we would be in Israel. In fact, one could now easily argue that Israel is probably safer.

There is no longer an excuse. If nothing else, let’s return to Israel and send our children to Israel. Terror has shown us that it is not something we can ultimately run away from. I, for one, would much rather face it in Israel than anywhere else.

Published: July 9, 2005


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Visitor Comments: 13

(13) jonathan, July 22, 2005 12:00 AM

you write; "9/11 was closer to home, but still far enough away"
i dont get it. New York is closer to your home? geographically? spiritually?
Have you ever been to Israel? do you know whwere it is?

(12) Dorit Ernst, July 19, 2005 12:00 AM

Many thanks - I'm reminded, too, at what I've not been doing enough!

(11) William, July 13, 2005 12:00 AM

Israel and Security

I just returned from my first trip to Israel and Gush Katif. I loved the people and the land. I enjoyed the Jerusalem bus rides and hitch hiking in Gush Katif. I visited the settlers in the Palm Beach Hotel and was invited to a cheese and wine tasting party in the hotel. I have never had such a wonderful visit as I did in Israel. I can not wait to return.

(10) Denise Rootenberg, July 12, 2005 12:00 AM

You can run but you can't hide

I left Zimbabwe for South Africa due to the terrorism there. After a few years, the crime made S. Africa unliveable so we moved to Canada where I was amused that "Did you hear the news?" meant only that the Blue Jays baseball team had won/lost. Now we are the only country left on Al Qaeda's list that has not yet been attacked (Heaven forbid). NY, London, Canada, Australia are not the golden medinas we once thought.

I am happy to report that almost all of my son's friends are going to Israel this summer.

(9) Anonymous, July 11, 2005 12:00 AM

Call for solidarity

A call for solidarity should not only be made for and with Israel but with every nation affected or likely to be affected by terror attacks - this is a culture, a value system that should be eradicated.

Let him who desire peace, prepare for war.
Vegetius

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