click here to jump to start of article
Join Our Newsletter

Join 400,000 Aish subscribers
Get Email Updates




The No Potato Passover

The No Potato Passover

With this new cookbook, it is indeed possible!

by

“Passover without potatoes? Impossible! We’ll starve!”

This is the typical reaction I hear whenever I tell people about The No-Potato Passover. If you had the same reaction when you first saw the title of this book, let me tell you, the LAST thing you’ll do is starve!

So how did this crazy idea come about?

I’ve always loved to experiment when it comes to cooking, creating recipes as colorful and interesting as possible. I have noticed that many people fall into a cooking rut; making the same three or four dishes again and again. They may have been great dishes to start, but after awhile they become the same old, repetitive meals you always make. Does this mean I’ll never cook another potato? Of course not! Trust me, the last thing I want is for you to feel limited by the lack of potatoes, but for the purpose of this challenge, I did not use either white or sweet potatoes in any recipe. Feel free to incorporate potatoes into any of the recipes in this book, but do me—and yourself!—a favor and try the original recipe first. You might be surprised!

Excerpted from No Potato Passover by Aviva Kanoff

Mixed Berry Quinoa with Roasted Almonds

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup red quinoa
  • 1 cup slivered almonds
  • 1 cup white quinoa
  • 5-6 medium mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 cup golden raisins
  • 1 Vidalia onion, diced
  • 1 cup Craisins
  • 2 tbsp. canola oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

1. Cook quinoa according to package.

2. In a separate skillet, sauté onions in canola oil until golden brown.

3. Add chopped mushrooms and sauté for one minute.

4. Add raisins, craisins and almonds, and sauté for another minute.

5. When quinoa is ready, add to pan and mix with other ingredients.

6. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Cajun Carrot Fries

Cajun Carrot FriesIngredients:

  • 8-10 large carrots, peeled and cut into thin slices, like “fries”
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper
  • salt and black pepper, to taste

Directions:

1. Preheat your oven to 450°.

2. Grease and/or line a large cookie sheet.

3. Toss the sliced carrots with olive oil, cayenne pepper, salt and black pepper.

4. Arrange the fries in a single layer on your baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, then flip the fries over and bake for another 10-15 minutes, until crisp. Serve warm.

Eggplant Parmigiana

Eggplant ParmigianaIngredients:

  • 2 cups tomato sauce
  • 1 large eggplant, sliced into ½ inch thick round pieces
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup matzoh meal or ground walnut (or half & half)
  • 8 oz. mozzarella cheese
  • 3 ounces goat cheese
  • (if unavailable, substitute with additional mozzarella)
  • salt and pepper

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. Salt eggplant on both sides and leave for 30 minutes until liquid is released.

3. Crack and mix eggs in one bowl, and pour matzoh meal and/or ground walnuts and seasoning into a second bowl.

4. Dip eggplant slices of eggplant first in eggs, then in matzoh meal and/or ground walnuts.

5. Fry each slice in canola oil for 2 minutes on each side until soft.

6. In a 9x12 inch pan, create layers with eggplant, goat cheese, and tomato sauce (creates about 3 layers).

7. Top with mozzarella cheese.

8. Bake, uncovered, for 20 minutes or until mozzarella cheese is melted.

Fresh Sea Bass with Grapefruit Relish

Fresh Sea Bass with Grapefruit RelishIngredients:

  • 2 ruby or pink grapefruits
  • 1 navel orange
  • 1 tbsp. fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. fresh mint, chopped
  • 4½ pounds fresh sea bass, skin and pin bones removed
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil, plus additional for drizzling

Directions:

1. Peel, segment and dice the grapefruits, letting the segments and any juices fall into a bowl. Add mint and cilantro and stir gently.

2. Season the sea bass fillets with salt and pepper. In a heavy frying pan over medium high heat, warm the olive oil. Add the seasoned sea bass and cook until browned underneath, 3 to 4 minutes. Turn the sea bass over and cook until opaque around the edges, about 3 minutes more.

3. Transfer the sea bass to individual plates. Spoon the grapefruit-mint mixture on top and drizzle with a little olive oil. Serve immediately.

Pesto Chicken “Pasta”

Pesto Chicken “Pasta”Hint: This dish can be served hot or cold, if you like more of a ''pasta salad'' effect!

Ingredients:

  • 4 large chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch thick strips
  • 2 cups shredded spaghetti squash
  • 1 cup walnut pesto (for recipe, see introduction)
  • ½ cup sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1 bell pepper cut into thin strips (optional)
  • salt and pepper

Directions:

1. Marinate chicken in pesto for about 30 minutes.

2. Sauté chicken strips in pan on medium flame until chicken is cooked through (about 7-10 minutes).

3. Add spaghetti squash, sun-dried tomatoes, and red bell pepper.

4. Season with salt and pepper, mix, and serve.

Walnut Pesto

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups fresh basil leaves, stems removed
  • 2 cups walnuts
  • 5 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • for dairy, add 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

This walnut pesto is perfect in the Pesto Chicken Pasta!

Directions:

Blend all ingredients in blender or food processor until finely ground.

Pomegranate Brisket

Pomegranate BrisketIngredients:

  • 5-pound brisket
  • ½ cup red wine
  • ½ cup pomegranate juice (you can use Ceres brand youngberry juice if pomegranate is unavailable)
  • 3 tbsp. honey
  • 3 tbsp. imitation mustard
  • 5 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. rosemary
  • salt and pepper
  • paprika
  • 1 large beet, diced
  • ½ cup pomegranate seeds (optional)
  • 1 large onion, diced

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 400°.

2. Place roast in an extra large roasting pan on top of diced onion, pomegranate seeds and diced beet.

3. Rub roast with olive oil, paprika, salt and pepper, and rosemary.

4. Mix together red wine, pomegranate juice, honey, and mustard, and pour over roast.

5. Cover and bake for 2-2½ hours, depending on how rare or well done you prefer.

No-Bake Chocolate Mousse Pie

No-Bake Chocolate Mousse PieIngredients:

  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 (7 oz.) can whipped cream
  • 10 chocolate chip macaroons
  • 1 tbsp. butter, melted
  • 6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions:

1. Crumble the macaroons in a medium-size mixing bowl. Combine the macaroon crumbles with the melted butter or margarine. Press mixture with your hands into a 9-inch pie plate.

2. Melt chocolate chips in a double boiler. Stir occasionally until smooth. Pour water into the chocolate and continue stirring until blended. Remove the chocolate from the heat.

3. Whip the sugar and eggs until thick and pale. Fold the chocolate mixture into the bowl with the sugar and eggs. Fold ½ whipped cream into the mixture.

4. Pour mixture into the pie crust. Decorate with remaining cream.

Click here to order your copy of The No Potato Passover cookbook

Published: March 18, 2012


Give Tzedakah! Help Aish.com create inspiring
articles, videos and blogs featuring timeless Jewish wisdom.

Visitor Comments: 14

(10) Anonymous, April 4, 2012 4:56 PM

Product availability

Unless you live in a major urban center with aa large Jewish community, forget about finding Craisins or slivered almonds that are KLP!

(9) Phyllis, March 21, 2012 5:01 AM

Ask your LOR if quinoa is kosher for Pesach

We had been using quinoa for many years for Pesach. A few years ago we were told to stop using it for Pesach. Check out Vaad Hakashrus of Baltimore's website for more info. Chag Kasher V'Someach!

Sara, March 28, 2012 2:14 PM

I understand that the Israeli Rabbanut has paskened that quinoa is fine for pesach; while the London Beit Din has ruled against it - I guess it depends on who you would follow!

(8) Jen in Oz, March 20, 2012 9:25 PM

raw eggs?

I never understood why people won't eat raw eggs. I do understand that there may be some danger for pregnant women and very very young babies, but the rest of us? what's the problem?

(7) chava, March 20, 2012 6:02 PM

canola oil

I've always considered canola oil kitniot, although I know it's a machloket. If you don't eat kitniot, check with your LOR before using canola oil. If you're having guests, be sure they're comfortable eating it. (This is not to mention that in the USA, more than 90 pct of the canola oil is genetically modified. Do you really want to give your family genetically modified "food"? How about using olive oil or nut oils instead. Or even coconut oil, which is enjoying a new reputation when it comes to whether or not it's good for you.)

See All Comments

Submit Your Comment:

  • Display my name?

  • Your email address is kept private. Our editor needs it in case we have a question about your comment.


  • * required field 2000
Submit Comment
stub
Sign up today!