Sukkot Specialties
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Sukkot Specialties

Sukkot Specialties

Recipes that make your holiday repertoire truly special.

by

Fancy and Easy Chicken in Wine
You can prepare this chicken dish two different ways. Both methods have excellent results. Method I is somewhat more professional culinary style, but if you want or need to cut out more of the fat and oil, and save about 15 minutes of time as well, Method II works just fine. They are both very tasty.

Method I:

  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, diced
  • 3 large carrots, peeled and diced
  • 1 chicken, skinned and separated into eighths
  • 2 cups frozen or fresh cut string beans (optional)
  • 1½ cups semi-dry white wine
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 1 teaspoons marjoram
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons dried parsley flakes
  • 1 bay leaf
  • oil as needed

In a large, flat pan that has a tight-fitting lid, place the diced onions and garlic and start to sauté them on a medium to high heat in about 1 tablespoon of oil. After a few minutes, add the carrots. When the vegetables are soft, remove them from the pan with a slotted spoon and reserve for later use.

Push the remaining vegetables to the sides of the pan and add a bit more oil to the center. Lower the flame to medium. Brown each piece of chicken on both sides in the oil for just a few minutes per side. If there is not enough room in the pan to brown them all at one time, do it in two or three batches, removing the chicken that is done to a plate on the side.

When all the chicken pieces are browned, remove them for a minute and put the sautéed vegetables back into the middle of the pan. Add in the green beans at this point if you wish. Then return the rest of the chicken pieces to the pan, placing them close together. Pour the wine over everything and cover the pan. Let the chicken in wine begin to bubble, then turn the flame down to low so it will simmer gently for the remainder of the cooking time.

It's important to use dry or semi-dry white wine, not red,; sweet wine will ruin this recipe.

In a small bowl, mix together the flour and all the spices. Open the pan and spoon the mixture over all the chicken pieces. The chicken will absorb some of it right away. Leave the pan on a low simmer; you should be able to see it bubbling gently all over – this is how you know it's cooking properly. Leave it to simmer this way until fork tender, about 1 hour and 10 minutes total cooking time from the time you returned the chicken pieces to the pan.

Serve over cooked rice. Incredibly delicious!

Method II:

Spray a large pan with baking oil. Layer the onions, garlic, carrots and green beans into the bottom of the pan. I used frozen baby carrots with this method, and the result was excellent. Layer the chicken pieces on top of the vegetables and spray them with a small amount of baking oil as well. Pour the wine over it all, but only use 1 cup with this method. Mix together the flour and spices and sprinkle the mixture evenly over the food in the pan. Cover the pan with baking paper and then with foil and bake it for 75 minutes at 350° F (180° C). During the last 10 minutes of baking time, loosen the foil on one side.

This method works very well when you're in a hurry, but the first method is even tastier.

My Savory Schnitzels

Serves 6

  • 2 lbs. / about 1 kilo of chicken or turkey boneless breasts, otherwise known as schnitzels, pounded or cut very thin in diameter
  • 2 – 3 cups breadcrumbs – and homemade ones from leftover Shabbos challahs are best!
  • 1 Tablespoon parsley flakes
  • 1 Tablespoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon oregano
  • 3 eggs or 4 egg whites
  • Mustard of any kind such as brown, spicy, or Dijon
  • Baking spray
  • Canola oil

There are two ways to make this, either on the stovetop, which requires a bit more input on the part of you, the cook, plus they also are a bit higher in oil content that way, or in the oven.

Rinse off the schnitzel pieces and dry them off a bit. In one bowl, mix together the breadcrumbs and all the seasonings. In another bowl, beat the eggs slightly with a fork and add in a generous squirt of mustard. Beat the mustard into the eggs.

If you are making this on the stovetop: Heat up a large frying pan with a bit of canola oil and start to prepare the schnitzels. Dip each one first into the bread crumb mixture, then into the egg mixture, then once again into the breadcrumbs. Lay it down immediately onto the heated pan. Keep doing this until all the pieces are done. Let the pieces "fry" on the pan for 10-12 minutes per side. To make sure it is cooked through, cut one open in the center; if it is no longer pink, it's done. Don’t over "fry" them or else they become tough and dry. If your chicken/turkey pieces are very thick, try slicing them into thinner pieces first before beginning so they won't take so long to cook up.

To bake these in the oven:

Preheat the oven to 375°F / 190°C. Spray the bottom of the roasting pan with baking spray. Lay the prepared schnitzels onto the pan in a single layer. Spray the tops of the schnitzels with more baking spray and then slide them into the oven to bake for 20-25 minutes, being careful not to overbake them.

With either method, they should come out sizzly, hot and scrumptious!

Now let's go on to a quick and delicious soup, which complements both main dishes quite nicely.

This soup serves wonderfully. It is such a light and creamy color that it is very appealing to people of all ages…

Creamy Pastel-Colored Soup (Serves 8)

  • 2 large onions, diced
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 6 large, firm carrots, peeled and chunked
  • 8 average size green zucchinis, scrubbed and chunked
  • 2 small potatoes, peeled and chunked
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/3 teaspoon pepper

In a large pot, saute the onions in the oil until they turn clear. Add in the chunked carrots, zucchini and potato. Cover with water plus an additional 2 inches of water. Add in the salt and pepper. Leave the flame on high until the soup begins to boil; then turn the flame down to simmer and continue to cook for another hour. Turn off the flame.

Puree the soup until it is completely smooth and creamy. Serve garnished with a small amount of parsley sprinkled into each bowl's center.

TIP: For diabetics, or anyone wanting to cut down on potatoes, you can leave out the potatoes and still have a delicious soup. It may be slightly thinner but still serves and presents very well.

And here’s a very nice, refreshing dessert to conclude your Succos menu.

Pareve Mint-Chocolate-Chip Ice Cream

This amount makes about 12 servings. The problem is that it is so good, there's not enough for seconds.

  • 8 – 9 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 packets vanilla sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon mint extract
  • 1 small container Rich's whip
  • 1 cup mini chocolate chips

Beat the egg whites until they begin to turn white. Do not turn off the mixer. Add in half the sugar and continue beating them until stiff. Set aside.

In a different mixing bowl, beat the egg yolks with the remaining sugar, vanilla sugar, and the mint extract. Keep beating on high until the yolks turn thick and light colored. Pour them into the whites. Using the now empty mixing bowl, beat up the Rich's whip.

Fold all three mixtures together by hand with a large spatula. Pour out half of it into a 9x13 pan or large plastic container, sprinkle on half the chips, then pour in the rest of the ice cream. Sprinkle on the remaining chips, and if you don’t have enough, add some more! For added fun you can squirt on some chocolate syrup over all. Freeze until solid and then scoop and serve. If you forget the chocolate syrup you can always add it instead on each individual serving. My kids love it when I buy ice cream cones and give each one his or her own scoops in cones-- Enjoy!

Have a wonderful Sukkot holiday,

All the best,
Tamar Ansh

Published: September 19, 2010


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Visitor Comments: 4

(4) Rabbi Alan Ira Silver, M.D., October 1, 2010 10:50 AM

One still must be very cautious "WorldWide"

Even with a stainless steel immune system one still has to be extra cautious when making food items with non-cooked eggs. There have been warnings against consuming raw or lightly cooked eggs on the grounds that the egg may be contaminated with Salmonella, a bacteria responsible for a type of food poisoning. For further safety, combine the whites with the sugar in the recipe (using a minimum of 2 tablespoons of sugar per white) and beat over hot water or over low heat in a heavy saucepan until the whites stand in soft peaks. Without sugar, the whites will coagulate too rapidly and produce an unsatisfactory meringue. Let us all have a "safe" and enjoyable chag. Chag Samayach - B'Tayavon with caution.

(3) Esther W, September 28, 2010 6:34 PM

answer to Rebecca Evers

I think a packet of vanilla sugar contains 1 tablespoon.

(2) Rebecca Evers, September 21, 2010 6:56 PM

question for Tamar Ansh, author of recipe

In the recipe for Mint-Chocolate-Chip Ice Cream, you call for 2 packets of vanilla sugar. I sometimes make vanilla sugar by putting a vanilla bean in ordinary granulated sugar. Is this the same thing? How large are the packets referred to? (How much sugar?) Can you translate this recipe to using ordinary sugar and vanilla extract? Thank you so much. Mint-Chocolate-Chip Ice Cream is one of my favorites, and I'm eager to try this version.

(1) Anonymous, September 21, 2010 5:07 PM

Yum! These look delicious!

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