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My Holocaust Experience

A survivor tells his story for the very first time.

After participating in the November 2010 Aish.com Mission to Israel, Mr Ben Hiller was inspired to share his experiences during the Holocaust for the very first time, as a legacy to his family and future generations.

Mr Hiller, born in Grojec, Poland, is one of 17 survivors of a city that once had a Jewish population of 7,000.

In this clip he recalls his Holocaust experiences through various ghettos, a labor camp and Theresienstadt.

Published: November 24, 2010

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Visitor Comments: 9

(8) David Rosen, August 4, 2015 12:41 AM

Ben Hiller Holocaust survivor

My family was very close to Ben bot in Grojec and America. In Grojec Ben was very close friends with my uncle Beniek, who did not survive the holocaust. Upon arriving in America he reconnected with remaining Koper family survivors from Grojec and he was treated like a son by my grandmother Malka Koper and like brother by my mother Paula, who eventually introduced Ben to his future wife Anne, and my aunt Mary and uncle Abe. We were instrumental in getting Ben a job in petticoat factory, where eventually became the factory foreman. As a young man I accompanied Ben to shul for his eufruf, Ben was not very observant then. He became observant after he married Anne. Over the years we lost touch with Ben and his family even though he and his family lived nearby in Fresh Meadows. I would curious if Ben ever shared this and other details (such all the holidays and Seders that were spent together) with his sons and grandchildren

(7) Beverly Kurtin, April 19, 2012 9:47 PM

Thank you

Every time I hear another Shoah survivor, my guts clench for those who did not survive. As a young girl, I was in the audience when the first newsreels showing the result of the Nazi's unfathomable fall into savagery were shown. Although very young, I went into shock. When the movie was over I did not budge an inch. Those walking skeletons and corpses were MY people. The ushers tried to tell me it was time to leave; I could not hear him. I was frozen in horror. Finally, someone figured that I was in shock. When I finally snapped out of the shock I started to cry and scream and scream and scream. In the meantime, my parents were called and they came to get me, My father stayed while my mother took me to someplace, I don't remember where because I was still trying to rid my eyes from what had happened, what I had seen. After my father had seen the newsreel, he understood my behavior. He, too, had had an emotional reaction; how could he not? To this day, some 65 years later, the images are still burned into my mind and why to this day I react so emotionally, sometimes violently, when I see films about the Shoah. But I cannot prevent myself from watching them...we must NEVER forget. How any one can be so hate filled that they can deny that the Shoah happened is totally beyond my ability to understand, so I don't even bother trying. On a different, but related subject, I recently discovered where the term antisemitism came from and WHY the term was coined. Wilhelm Marr, a perennial looser who blamed Jewish employers for whom he worked for his failures. He argued that Jewish emancipation resulting from German liberalism had allowed the Jews to control German finance and industry. He thought that the term Jew-hate was too harsh so he coined "antisemitism." Towards the end of his life, he renounced his own Jew-hate which is puzzling as while he was a rabid antisemite he married two Jewish women. Thanks go to every survivor for telling their stories; I love them.

(6) Anonymous, March 24, 2012 9:25 PM

Fajga Rajter born in Grojec in 1907, Holocaust victim

Fajga was my deceased husband's birth mother. I would love to talk to someone who might have known her or her family in Grojec. She immigrated to Paris, but I do not know when. Her son, Leon, was born in Paris 8n 1940 before she was deported to Auschwitz, where she died.

(5) Rachel, March 20, 2012 3:00 AM

Thank You

Thank you Mr Hiller! I started this video and couldn't stop till the end. Your life story and attitude about it are an inspiration - may you and your family be blessed.

(4) Anonymous, March 2, 2012 3:28 AM

I saw him today at the holocaust museum he is now 86 years old he told us about his life he was one of the 17 survivors in his city.

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