Jtube: Different Strokes: Conversion

If you weren’t born Jewish do you think you would convert to Judaism?

If you weren’t born Jewish do you think you would you convert to Judaism?

This video encourages the discussion of Jewish values as they relate to contemporary culture. Jewlarious does not endorse any particular film.


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Comments (12)

(11) Rich B, December 27, 2013 7:47 PM

Yes... Kind of

I thought that I was born Jewish, but it turns out that my mother's conversion is halachically questionable. I have been given a great opportunity to get coaching to live a better Jewish life or to choose to live as Bnei Noach. It took very little time for me to decide to proceed down the road to conversion. Even for someone raised in a less observant background, living life as an observant Jew is a huge learning process and takes a lot of work. This is an entirely different lifestyle, but one which gives meaning to the most mundane things. For example, I just had an orange as a snack. For many, that's all it is, but for me, I am able to connect that snack to thousands of years of heritage with a simple blessing, and take a moment to consider how I was able to get that orange.
This is a lifestyle of kindness and gratitude and I am grateful to be able to experience it.

(10) Inbar Eden, January 7, 2013 7:27 PM

I converted - so definitely YES!

I was brought up in a Christian family, where I was taught that God created everything and expects us to live according to His rules, being good to other people and doing good. And I witnessed that members of my family did not just talk but also lived this way. I chose Judaism because as a non-Jew I had something good and found something so much better. Every day I learn about how much more spiritual wealth and joy Judaism offers, and I know I can never exhaust its potential. Thank God I dared to ask for conversion. Thank God I succeeded in the end. The depth of the connection to God Judaism makes possible is worth ANY price! For all Jews who wonder whether to truly commit to Judaism: take the plunge. No matter what happens, you can choose no greater good, and experience no greater blessing!

rachel, January 10, 2013 11:02 PM

wow

wow! wonderfull story. i am so happy u became jewish. it insprires me every time i hear about anoother person who found the light

(9) Simcha, January 3, 2013 8:16 AM

Error in the year!!!

This was from the year 1984 NOT 2004. On the screen it is written '04. It should been written '84.

(8) Donna Brocker, January 2, 2013 7:08 PM

as a convert - loved this :)

As someone on the conversion I loved this video :) It shows the lighter side of Judaism and all the emotions one goes through... loving Judaism as well as feeling the gravity of it...For sure when one starts like Arnold you have NO idea what you are getting yourself in for, but its good to be able to laugh about it..for sure Judaism is the greatest gift int he world... Great job on the video :)

(7) C. Cowan, January 2, 2013 1:49 AM

The Road to Conversion

As one traveling down the road to becoming a Jew, I found this old episode from Different Strokes very revealing. It’s a major commitment and one I take very seriously. There are many personal challenges to deal with, but the further I travel, the more beautiful the Jewish faith and culture becomes. Thank you for reawakening my faith.

(6) Cindy, January 2, 2013 1:13 AM

Purpose

Being converted Orthodox is wonderful, but is a also a grave responsibility...not only to the jewish people but to the world around me. HaShem has blessed me and I only pray that I may be worthy to be His servant by learning all I can and also by being an example to others.l

(5) Catharine GeMeiner, January 2, 2013 12:51 AM

I already have!

I converted to Judaism at age 75. I am the only Jew in the family. I converted on my own volition-not for marriage. It feels right to me. Kate GeMeiner

(4) Anonymous, January 2, 2013 12:06 AM

been there, done that

Converting should be for the sake of emes and Torah, not for marriage. I have seen people who did it for the wrong reason and they were not committed enough to continue to be shomer mitzvos. There are those exceptions who go on to be more committed than their spouse. But conversion is a serious thing. The Rabbis are right to dissuade potential converts.

(3) DAVID LEYBIK, January 1, 2013 5:16 PM

nothig wrong with a good goy

REB MOISHE FEINSTEIN PASKENS THAT IF SOMEONE CLAIMS THEY ARE JEWISH WE BELIEVE THEM;WHY'BECAUSE TODAY IF SOMEONE CLAIMS TO BE JEWISH HE WOULD HAVE TO BE CRAZY TO DO IT FOR NO REASON;SO WE HAVE A CHAZAKA THAT HE IS TELLING THE TRUTH.THAT BEING THE CASE WHY SHOULD A NON-JEW WANT TO BE BECOME JEWISH UNLESS THEY REALLY ARE SERIOUSLY READY TO ACCEPT EVERYTHING JEWISH.HALEVAI ALL OUR JEWISH BROTHERS WOULD ACCEPT THE JEWISH RELIGION; TODAY'UNFORTUNATELY;MOST ARABS LOOK BETTER TO G-D THAN SOME JEWS[THEY DON'T EAT PORK AND THEIR WEOMEN DRESS MORE LIKE JEWS THAN MANY JEWISH GIRLS DO.

(2) Avigail Spencer, January 1, 2013 4:49 PM

Yes!

I converted...twice. The first conversion was conservative in, of all places, Idaho. And the second, in Jerusalem...considered to be "hallachic, after I made aliyah. Being Jewish is who I am and who I am going to be. I can't live any other way. I agree with "Rabbi Berle", it takes commitment, and a whole lot more, but it gives so much. A set of guides and values for living life practically and a community in which to practice and carry out those goals. And in which to celebrate!

(1) SANDRINE, January 1, 2013 4:32 PM

My Heart Religious

I'm Buddhist since 11 years now. I will never change because i feel "home" and myself with this Religion. Owerwise, for many reasons i can't explain: Judaism "speaks" to my Soul and Heart and i feel close to this Religion.I always keep such a strange "Love" who makes me learn more about Judaism.

 

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