Jtube: Searching for Bobby Fischer

How can we foster greatness in our children?

This video encourages the discussion of Jewish values as they relate to contemporary culture. Jewlarious does not endorse any particular film.


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Comments (8)

(6) Mordechai Shuali, September 2, 2014 8:30 PM

50% Adult or 100% 10 Year Old

Erickson (and in reality it is a Medrash) discusses the stages of growth in terms of social/psychological/physical challenges/tests/needs.

It can be summed up by the following: A 10 year old is NOT 50% adult, but rather 100% 10 year old. Newborns, children, teens, young adults, and adults have needs. Addressing those needs and clearing the various hurdles, are what creates a well developed, well adjusted individuals, prepared to face the challenges of the next stage of life. That is all the teacher was trying to teach. She was more aware of and caring for the needs of her student than the father was. The father's selfish need to live/accomplish vicariously through his son is spiritual/psychological homicide. The mother understood.

Baruch, September 8, 2014 9:28 PM

King Solomon said it best...

Chanoch Lana'ar Al Pi Darko... each child needs their learning to be tailored to who they are.

This was a brilliant scene, capturing the difficulty of that challenge. The teacher saw the child's basic educational and social needs, but utterly failed to grasp the greatness of the boy's talent. The father did the exact opposite, realizing the unique opportunity to nurture the talent of his son for an intellectual challenge worthy of mastery. The mother, with her caring, could have brought the 2 together and built a bridge, enhancing their points, but instead tried to stifle the conflict in her confusion.

Good chinuch is indeed one of the greatest of challenges.

(5) Anonymous, August 28, 2014 3:41 PM

The teacher seems to be concerned for the child-being well rounded and appreciating what most people appreciate such as important historical sites as opposed to hotel rooms. What else was he lacking-social awareness and skills?-which are important for a happy well rounded life as well. Having a great talent can be the seeds for admiration and acceptance by others if one has an appreciation for other people and the skills to foster those relationships or it can lead to social isolation.

(4) Oscar Abraham, August 27, 2014 6:40 AM

not Bobby Fischer

No wants to be like Bobby Fischer. He was certainly a chess genius. A failure at everything else. A virulent anti-semite on top of his overall paranoia.

(3) Jaya, August 27, 2014 12:14 AM

Searching !

Why were the parents so touchy ? What was the teacher trying to say ? I am at a loss , she deserved to be heard , she appeared like a well wisher , no , this confuses me !

Alan S., August 28, 2014 12:00 AM

Actually, the teacher, in effect, was questioning the child's desire to excel at chess, and also questioning the parent's right to raise his child as he saw fit. I am not a teacher, but I do not think this is the place of a teacher. She wouldn't question a parent or child that excelled at sports. The teacher was injecting herself into the family dynamic without right.

(2) Alan S., August 24, 2014 10:44 PM

Every normal parent does what they can to foster greatness when they see their child excel at something. Of course, this can vary. But at the very least, the child can expect that s/he will get their parent's full acceptance. In this scene, the child saw his father stand up for him and what they both believed in. This is the very least that a parent can do to foster greatness.

(1) Bobby5000, August 24, 2014 10:27 PM

Chess and article

Interesting piece. Whether you want your chid to be a prodigy is tough and the movie about Bobby Fischer's sad life, social inadeptness, and lack of family relationships must also be considered. While Josh is a very good chessplayer, that is relative.

The story goes Waitzin went to Russia and met the great trainer Dvoretsky. Apologetically the chess trainer says he cannot teach Josh because his programs are designed only for advanced players. The father explain Josh's rating and U.S. standing. Dvoretsky smiles saying I know who your son is, but he does not have an international title and in my program, he would be considered an intermediate player.

 

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