Video: The Six Constant Mitzvos: Know there is a God
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The Six Constant Mitzvos: Know there is a God

How to build a relationship with God.

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Published: April 30, 2011

SIX MITZVAHS, SEVEN WEEKS - CONSTANT BENEFITS

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Visitor Comments: 15

(11) Anonymous, September 26, 2011 5:20 PM

wow

this clip is rlly good! i had some questions about G-d and a friend forwarded this to me. its a lot to take in i think but.... wow! it makes sense.

(10) Shoshana, May 5, 2011 1:21 AM

Great

Awesome combination of ideas choice vs coercion (through revelation).

(9) Dvirah, May 4, 2011 5:46 PM

Sensing G-D

We do have a spiritual sense (at least one) with which we can learn to sense G-d no less than we feel, hear, see, smell and touch. It needs to be cultivated, much as we cultivate our ears in learning music. Thank you, Mr. Haray, for outlining some of the ways this sense can be cultivated.

(8) Anonymous, May 4, 2011 1:13 PM

don't really agree with everything in this video

While a relationship with Hashem is important and that we "must" be with someone for marriage in order to be "complete", for me personally, finding a meaningful relationship with someone can be very difficult for me since I have Asperger syndrome thereby impacting me socially. I do want to be with the right Jewish woman. However, it's been 8 years since I've vowed that after my first trip to Israel. So, I don't really know whether my bashert really exists at the rate of my Asperger's and not so good social skills. I don't really feel any mutual chemistry or connection with any Jewish woman to the point I know she is either my bashert or I can at least form a meaningful relationship with. I understand that if one is not so happy being single, then chances are he/she will not be happy either married or in a relationship...Furthermore is the first mitzvah of knowing G-d exists more important than helping those less fortunate than the other. I would wonder what the priorities are when it comes to mitzvot. Of course, I do understand that G-d is in control of the world at the end of the day...Also, when it comes to thinking for one's self, how do we balance that and letting Hashem guide the way? I feel like I'm a very deep thinker. Is it idolatry to over-think more than letting Hashem help guide us?

Anonymous, May 9, 2011 2:24 AM

I think you asking really important questions and I felt the need to respond. I, by no means, claim I have the asnwers; perhaps just another perspective. I do not think there is a hierarchy, per se, within the mitzvot. It is almost irrelevant to ask whether knowing Gd is more important than helping another. I do think, from my own experience, that knowing Gd and creating a relationship with Gd is the foundation to all other aspects of life. So it's not about choosing one mitzva over the other. And you are right; if a person is not happy single, they will not find happiness being married. Knowing Gd is a process which includes knowing and understanding yourself and your purpose. Only once you feel connected with Gd, yourself, and your purpose (to some extent) can you share that with another person in marriage. Your question about our effort vs Gd input is a really great question also. I would suggest you listen to Rabbi Akiva Tatz lecture on that topic at simpletoremember.com titled World Mask: Effort and Trust. He has incredible insight to so many of these questions. I would also say that it is certainly not idolatry to 'overthink' as you call it. Perhaps it is related to a lack of trust (emunah) in Hashem which would be something to work on and investigate further...but thinking and evaluating is certainly not idolatry in fact, it is crucial in decision making. I hope that was helpful to some extent. All the best.

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