Mystical Tour Parshat Beshalach: What Do I Do?
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Beshalach(Exodus 13:17-17:16)

What Do I Do?

From a practical, physical standpoint, this week's Torah portion begins with something that's hard to understand. The Almighty takes the Jewish people out from hundreds of years of slavery, leads them a few days into the wilderness, and then has the Egyptians come to take them back.

It doesn't seem to make sense: If they just left, why is God putting them in jeopardy again?!

* * *

SPIRITUAL VS. PHYSICAL

Sometimes the spiritual viewpoint is the opposite of the physical viewpoint. One mistaken assumption about life is that things should always be pleasant and comfortable. When they are not pleasant and comfortable, we say there's a problem: Why is God doing this to me? Why me?

The truth is that if God wanted our lives to be pleasant and comfortable, He wouldn't have put us into this world. If you lie in bed you are comfortable, but if you do it too long your muscles begin to atrophy. Effort and struggle will increase your muscle strength.

The message is that life is not meant to be easy. Life is meant to be for growth. In order to grow, we need struggles. We need a challenge.

The nation of Israel needed that particular challenge at that particular time. It was designed and crafted for their spiritual growth.

* * *

WHAT DO I DO?

The Israelites were in a predicament. On one side was the Sea of Reeds; on the other was the well-equipped Egyptian army. What should they do? Some said fight. Some said pray. Some said jump into the sea. Some said surrender.

Wouldn't you think the "biblical" answer is to pray? Yet God says to Moses, "Why do you cry out to me? Speak to the Children of Israel and tell them to journey forth." (Exodus 14:15)

It seems that each group, everyone was suggesting the thing most comfortable with their personality or general pattern of behavior. Someone who is always ready to fight thinks that's the way to resolve things. Someone who always prays thinks that's the way to resolve things. As my friend Rabbi Mordechai Rottman likes to say, "When you're a hammer, you think everything's a nail."

In order to know exactly what God wants from you, you have to ask the question honestly. You have to be multi-talented, at various times ready to fight, negotiate, or flee.

* * *

WHO AM I?

God created each and every one of us with amazing gifts and abilities. Each human being is like an expensive jewel waiting to be honed to perfection. Our lives take twists and turns, but always leave room for our true talents to emerge. We are always guided from on high.

But for a natural-born surgeon, surgery is not the greatest challenge. The greatest challenge may be in humility. And here is life's glorious dichotomy: What comes easy and natural is what we should spend our life doing. But our challenges and true spiritual growth come from what we find difficult.

* * *

A TRUE TORAH PERSONALITY

When we study the great Torah personalities, we find a variety of great people. Each one had a unique way of dealing with life and relating to the Infinite. Sometimes a person may wonder, "I can try to mold myself to be like so many holy people. Which one is the best or truest Torah personality?"

This question was posed to one of the great sages of the past generation: "What is the true Torah personality?" To which he responded, "Whichever one the situation in front of you demands."

* * *

ARE YOU UNCOMFORTABLE?

Abraham achieved greatness doing acts of kindness, but his real change and growth came from his challenge with the binding of Isaac, an act that was the opposite of his character trait of kindness.

Similarly, we need to constantly focus on what our accomplishment and contribution to the world can be, based on our talents and abilities. Yet at the same time, we need to be ready at any moment to abandon what comes easy when the time and opportunity arises and we're faced with a situation that requires the opposite character.

We need to be willing to do what is uncomfortable.

* * *

Spiritual Exercise:

Ask yourself the following questions:

What do I value about my personality? Is that something that comes easy to me?

When was the last time I did something that was uncomfortable, because it was the right thing to do?

Is there anything I'm avoiding that is the right thing to do, because it makes me uncomfortable?


Published: January 31, 2009

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Visitor Comments: 4

(4) Ann, January 31, 2012 3:12 PM

Good lesson to learn

Thank You Rabbi for it is a good lesson for me to learn how to bring up my teenage son. I tend to be more spiritual and resolve my problem by praying but my husband thinks prayer is not enough but through action and work.

(3) Anonymous, January 30, 2012 4:06 PM

great Parsha

Just what I needed right now between a rock and a hard place just the questions I needed to ask myself

(2) Dr. Yonatan Kent, February 6, 2009 6:32 AM

What different worlds we live in!

Responding to (1) Hannah: I agree that Rabbi Weiman's insight is valuable. But the response sharpens the differences that exist between the safety of the North American Jewish experience with that of our experience in Israel. Do you want your children to learn to make uncomfortable choices? Why not move here and make a difference just by waking up every morning in your own land. With the rising of Sharia law in North America (Canada is about to legalize polygamy since denial of this "right," like same-sex marriages, is now unconstitutional) you will soon find yourself surrounded with uncomfortable choices in your own back yard. Come home!

(1) Hannah, February 4, 2009 12:40 AM

Great food for thought

Thank you Rabbi, this article is great food for thought. I am thinking of the kids at school today: Everything is instant, everything comes easy. And one can certainly not teach them anything that makes them uncomfortable! Things that need "drilling" like times tables and spelling is included in this. We concentrate on "fun" activities, and the times tables and the spelling suffers. But: who cares? As long as it is "fun." I just took the kids as an example because I am working with them daily. But the adults are to blame, it is us teaching them that they never have to face anything that feels uncomfortable. So, sadly, what we teach the kids at school today is directly opposed to this teaching. We need to look at the way we raise kids today and ask ourselves if we are doing them a favor. And if not ...what can we do about it.

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