Shraga's Weekly Parshat Va'eira: God? Who is God!?
click here to jump to start of article
Join Our Newsletter

Get latest articles and videos with Jewish inspiration and insights​




Va'eira(Exodus 6:2-9:35)

God? Who is God!?

The story is well-known: The Jews want to leave Egypt, so God sends 10 fierce plagues ... and Pharaoh's opposition is adamant.

How is it possible that Pharaoh could fail to recognize the obvious deeds of God Almighty Himself?!

Pharaoh epitomizes denial of God. This is evident from Exodus 5:1, the first meeting between Moses and Pharaoh, where Moses utters the immortal words: "Let My People Go!" Pharaoh responds with bewilderment: "Who is God that I should listen to him? I don't know this God!"

The purpose of the plagues, therefore, is to announce that God is running the show. Once and for all, loud and clear.

The 10 plagues are actually a progression, a process bringing Pharaoh to a recognition of God. Consider:

The first plague turns the Nile River into blood. Why? Because Pharaoh had been promoting himself as a deity who created the Nile, as he says, "I am the river and I created it" (Ezekiel 29:3). Pharaoh goes to such extents to preserve his godly image that he sneaks down to the river alone to relieve himself; hence God tells Moses to "pay a call on Pharaoh in the morning, when he goes out to the water..." (Exodus 7:15)

Moses turns the Nile into blood but Pharaoh is not impressed. His magicians are called in and they do the same. God might be a good magician, thinks Pharaoh, but He's not out of my league!

God of Nature

As the plagues continue, Pharaoh is moved along a process of increasing recognition of who God is. When Moses brings the plague of lice, Pharaoh calls upon his magicians to reproduce the phenomenon, but they can't. "'It is the finger of God,' say the magicians to Pharaoh." (Exodus 8:14)

Why were they unable to make lice? The Talmud (Sanhedrin 67) says because magic has no power over something tiny.

Like modern science today, Pharaoh's magicians can gather and manipulate existing energy, but they can't create the building-blocks of life itself. No matter how small a particle is discovered, there is always a foundation of smaller particles below that.

When Pharaoh's magicians say "It is the finger of God," they refer to God by the name of Elokim, which represents the power of God acting through nature. (Elokim has the numerical value of 86, which is the same as "HaTeva" - nature.) Pharaoh and his men had advanced one huge step along the continuum. They recognized God as the force controlling nature. But this was not sufficient. Pharaoh still refuses to let the Jews go. He wants to play hardball with God.

One Step Closer

The climax of our Parsha is the plague of hail, where Egyptian resources are totally wiped out. Every tree is smashed, and every man and animal caught outdoors is killed (Exodus 9:25). As Pharaoh stands amidst the rubble of a country in ruins, he now declares, "I am wrong and God is right." This time Pharaoh refers to God by the ineffable YKVK - the transcendent aspect of God that we cannot comprehend.

It took a lot of pounding over the head, but Pharaoh has finally matured in his recognition of God.

Yet somehow, miraculously, he still refuses to let the Jews go. How great is the human ego and the power of rationalization!

God's Awesome World

In many respects, Pharaoh's process is our process, too. When we are children, we think we are the center of the universe. Then, through experience and trials, we become increasingly aware of things beyond our control. Whether earthquakes, cancer, the rise and fall of fortunes, even life and death itself... these can only be ascribed to a Higher Power.

In short, life is a series of such recognitions. But sometimes we get confused, we forget, and slip back in the continuum.

Why? Because with each technological advancement, we sense the unlimited potential of man. The 4-minute mile. A robot to Mars. Cell phones and the internet. We are in awe of what is humanly possible.

But where is our awe of that which only God is possible?! Gravity... eyesight... ant farms...

Lessons Today

The commentators say that the 10 plagues were not only for the sake of Pharaoh. They were for the Jews as well. To watch and to absorb the lessons of who God is. That training is a prerequisite to the coming revelation at Sinai.

We've all got to reach that recognition. One way or the other, Pharaoh is going to acknowledge God and let the Jews go. The only question is whether Pharaoh's route to that end will be in cooperation with God, or in opposition.

The Talmud says that "each person must see himself as if he personally came out of Egypt." Our lives are filled with messages from the Almighty, designed to teach us His ways and draw us near. He has a plan, and we have the choice: To fit in, or to be cut out. The choice is clear if we only open our eyes.

Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Shraga Simmons

Published: January 15, 2000

Give Tzedakah! Help Aish.com create inspiring
articles, videos and blogs featuring timeless Jewish wisdom.

Visitor Comments: 10

(10) Michal, December 29, 2013 11:00 AM

I totally agree with "Hashem in action"

I like what this reader said. And I like your article very much, Rabbi Shraga. I know this story and all what happened at least for 75 years and Hashem gave you the gift to tell it in a way, that I read it as if I read it for the first time. Yes, I was led
out of Egypt. I can't explain my thankfullness.

(9) Dieter Rapp Junior, December 26, 2013 12:47 PM

GOD

Thank You for all........................................

(8) Edwin, January 11, 2013 12:24 PM

Hard ball

And through knowledge and science we still play hard ball with G-d and we are still getting nowhere

(7) Scott Edelman, January 6, 2013 5:01 PM

New king

Rabbi, Last week I emailed you asking where the idea came from that it was NOT a new king that arose over Egypt. Okay, I read Rashi and Sotah 11a - "A new king arose [There is a controversy between] Rav and Samuel. One says: He was really new, and the other one says: His decrees were new. [From Sotah 11a, Exod. Rabbah 1:8] Since the Torah does not say: The king of Egypt died, and a new king arose, it implies that the old king was still alive, only that his policies had changed, and he acted like a new king." Okay, the Torah does not say the king died, but it certainly says "a new king arose". In addition this was app 200 years after Joseph, there are very few people who lived for 200 years at that time, very few. The Talmud records debates, but in many cases only to show there was a debate, the final ruling is ultimately most important. The Torah does not say "his decrees were made new" the Torah says it was a "new king". Therefore it was a new king.

(6) sherman katz, December 30, 2010 7:06 PM

Taking GOD for granted

This commentary points out that we think we are so important. But we see from this Parsha that Hashem is in control, not any king or state leader.

See All Comments

Submit Your Comment:

  • Display my name?

  • Your email address is kept private. Our editor needs it in case we have a question about your comment.


  • * required field 2000
Submit Comment
stub