Just Breathe: Security & Sukkot

From where do you get your sense of security?

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Comments (13)

(10) Hinda, September 30, 2017 10:18 PM

BRILLIANT

A brilliant video, with a brilliant message.
(Did you have racoons last year in the end?)

(9) Tova Saul, September 27, 2015 11:15 AM

Raccoons are not scary

The message in this video is beautiful, and my favorite concept about Sukkot. Just want to add that we don't need "faith in Hashem" to not fear raccoons. They don't go out of their way to attack people.

(8) Dovid, October 13, 2014 3:39 PM

*Lisa-I read this in my sukkah...on my iPad

Of course we can't do everything the physical way that B'nei Yisrael did it, the point is to engage the mental and emotional framework in which to live out lives. In those ways, we can aspire to be exactly like our illustrious ancestors. Living with G-d, no matter where you find yourself.

(7) Anonymous, October 6, 2014 5:26 PM

Excellent!

This is excellent and so inspiring! Thank you so much for posting this!

(6) Janet/ Toronto, October 1, 2013 2:11 AM

Raccoons Are Dangerous

Raccoons can scratch and bite people. They carry very serious diseases such as rabies, and horrible parasites such as round worm which can be transfered to humans.. In the world of wildlife rehab only those with a current rabies shot are allowed anywhere near a raccoon. You say that the raccoon was on your festive table eating everything- which makes the entire table unsanitary, contaminated and unsafe to eat from. The bacteria in their mouth and under their claws is very dangerous to humans. One should never even consider eating anything that a raccoon has been anywhere near. The Rabbi seems to not understand the danger and since it is Sukkoth he seems to feel extra protected but a bit of knowledge about using caution around wild animals and being aware of the very real dangers they can pose coupled with some common sense should tell a person that these are potentially very dangerous wild animals. Hopefully the Rabbi will read this comment and have a more cautious approach to the raccoons that show up in his Succa next year.

Tzvi Sytner, October 1, 2013 2:14 PM

Thanks!

Thanks for the comment! Yes, we added a new locked door this year!

Anna McGuire, October 1, 2017 2:39 PM

I agree with Janet

Raccoons are nocturnal animals. Should one be out during the day, it is most likely sick, possibly with rabies. G-d provided us with the ability to be aware of things that were not known in earlier times. And no matter in or out of shelter, G-d is everywhere.

(5) Gary, September 24, 2013 9:41 PM

G-D and Racoons

Great article, but my sense was that G-D still expects us to work
within the natural order of things, even if He is the ultimate source of security. So in this case, I would think that the author would be Ok with trying some ways to keep the racoons out of his sukkah (e.g. shutting doors when not in
use, some kind of repellant, etc.) Think this is consistent with the article, but just thought I'd add the point:).

(4) Lisa, September 22, 2013 2:19 PM

We all EAT in our Sukkot then......

Then most of us live the rest of our day inside...wether it be the shul or the workplace or our homes. So are we really living as B' nei Yisrael lived? How many of us read this video in the Sukkah?
Just sayin......

(3) Karen, September 18, 2013 5:29 AM

Healthy view

Such a fresh, healthy perspective. Loved it!

(2) Ann Canada, September 18, 2013 2:15 AM

Wonderful, Rabbi, wonderful!

(1) Emilie, September 18, 2013 12:48 AM

Security

Ask Netanyahu if he only depends on G-d for "security"

Dvirah, October 4, 2013 2:06 PM

Ultimately: Yes!

If you mean by "only" sitting idle and expecting G-d to do your work for you, no. But without G-d's help and protection, nothing that people do will help. So we all do what we can and rely on G-d for the result. (See also comment 5.) For every terrorist attack which succeeds, there are 20 that don't - both work and prayer are needed constantly!

 

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