The Maggid of...">

Growing Each Day by Rabbi Abraham J. Twerski

Cheshvan 16
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It is a Divine kindness that His mercies are endless (Lamentations 3:22).

Another way to translate this verse is, "It is a Divine kindness that we are never finished."

The Maggid of Koznitz was extremely frail and sickly as a child. It was not thought that he would survive to adulthood. Much of his life was spent sick in bed, and he was so weak that he was often unable to sit up to meet visitors. Still, he lived to an advanced age.

The Maggid once revealed the secret of his longevity. "I never allowed myself to be without an assignment or a task to perform," he said. "People are taken from this world only when their missions here are completed. Whenever I was just about to finish one task, I would start another; hence, I could not be removed from this world if my assignment was not completed."

Even from a purely physiological aspect, the Maggid's concept is valid. Some think that the healthiest thing for us is rest and relaxation. Not so. In reality, unused muscles tend to atrophy, while muscles that are exercised and stimulated are strengthened.

The same principle applies to the entire person. If we constantly stimulate ourselves to achieve new goals, we avoid the apathy that leads to atrophy.

Today I shall...

try to take on a new spiritual goal, and stimulate myself to greater achievement in serving God and being of help to other people.

With stories and insights, Rabbi Twerski's new book Twerski on Machzor makes Rosh Hashanah prayers more meaningful. Click here to order...

 

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